It Happened One Night & the Lessons of Unexpected Success

It Happened One Night premiered on February 22, 1934. Almost everyone involved in the project agreed it would be a major flop. Some of the actors even believed it was the worst film of their careers and the only person who thought it would succeed was its director, Frank Capra.

The movie went on to win the first ever Oscars Grand Slam, taking home awards for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Screenplay. It’s also included in almost every list of top films, and is accepted as the first screwball comedy, launching thousands of others after it. Continue reading “It Happened One Night & the Lessons of Unexpected Success”

What Galileo Can Teach Us About Entrepreneurship & Management

Today marks Galileo’s 452nd birthday. If he were still alive, I think he would be surprised by how many scientific advances we’ve made in the past few hundred years, many of which would not have been possible without his work.

Galileo is often regarded as the father of modern astronomy and physics. That’s impressive in and of itself. But I would argue that Galileo’s legacy extends beyond this into other areas, including entrepreneurship and management.

I’ll explain more in the post below. Continue reading “What Galileo Can Teach Us About Entrepreneurship & Management”

The Legacy of Thomas Edison: Why You Need to Invent & Commercialize

Thomas Edison was born 169 years ago on February 11, 1847. A great inventor and businessman, he developed the electric light bulb, as well as the motion picture camera and the phonograph. And although these are his most well-known inventions, he actually held 1,093 U.S. patents in his lifetime.

Now, you may be asking: why should I care? It’s 2016, after all – this seems like ancient history.

I get that. But in this post, I’ll explain a little bit more about Edison’s life, and the lessons that modern entrepreneurs and innovators can take away from it. Continue reading “The Legacy of Thomas Edison: Why You Need to Invent & Commercialize”

From 1775 to 2016: Why Massachusetts Is Still a Revolutionary State

On February 9, 1775, the British Parliament declared that Massachusetts was in a state of rebellion. That was exactly 241 years ago, and yet, this revolutionary spirit has not disappeared. In fact, I would argue that it can be found throughout the Bay State’s history – and even today – in everything from politics to sports to technology. Continue reading “From 1775 to 2016: Why Massachusetts Is Still a Revolutionary State”

Shorten the Sales Cycle: 6 Tips for Reaching Logistics Decision Makers

As a sales professional, you know how difficult it can be to reach decision makers. Maybe they’re too busy for a phone conversation or you’re just not targeting the right people. Whatever it may be, if you’re looking to shorten the sales cycle, you need to understand who your best buyers are in order to fuel your pipeline with new contacts. Continue reading “Shorten the Sales Cycle: 6 Tips for Reaching Logistics Decision Makers”

Decreasing Product Monetization Window with Increasing Revenue Potential

product-monetization

Evolving Product Life Cycles

Product Life Cycle is a chart that denotes the different stages in a product’s life: in the Introduction phase the product is developed and launched, customers are acquired in the Growth phase, the product has its peak in the Maturity stage, and it’s phased out of the market in the Decline stage. Most of the revenue is made during the Maturity stage and, so as a marketer, one of the main objectives historically, has been to extend the Maturity phase as long as possible. Continue reading “Decreasing Product Monetization Window with Increasing Revenue Potential”